10 Things about Ginger

Ginger Rhizomes

Ginger Rhizomes

10 things about ginger:

1) It is important in pumpkin spice which is part of a Pumpkin Spice Latte #PSL.

2) It is described as warm, spicy,pungent, woody and/or citrusy.

3) It is commercially available in several different forms:

  • ginger rhizome (fresh “root”)
  • ginger powder (dried and ground)
  • ginger essential oil (steam distilled)
  • ginger oleoresin (solvent extracted)
  • ginger CO2 extract (extracted with supercritical carbon dioxide)

4) It is commercially available from many different growing regions: including India, China, Jamaica, Africa, Japan and the Middle East. Each growing region ginger varies in composition and flavor profile.

5) Ginger is used to flavor a variety of  food and beverages:

  • Beverages: including chai tea, Grand Marnier®, ginger ale, ginger beer
  • Baked goods: including ginger snaps, pumpkin pie, gingerbread and cakes
  • Culinary products: including curry, stir fry, Japanese seven-spice and pickled ginger
  • Confections: chewing gums and candies

6) Citral, an inexpensive aromatic aldehyde found in ginger, is used in flavor formulas to extend ginger oil and reduce cost.

7) Ginger blends well with stone fruits (peach/cherry) and lemon.

8) Ginger oleoresin contains the pungent non-volatiles: gingerols, shogal, zinger one. Therefore, ginger oleoresin adds the “taste” component and is useful in bakery flavors and ginger ale flavor.

9)  Flavor materials that are useful in ginger ale formulas are

  • Ginger oleoresin
  • Capsicum oleoresin
  • Ginger essential oil
  • Citral
  • Distilled Lime oil
  • Lemon Essential oil
  • Eugenol
  • Coriander oil
  • Orange essential oil

10) Ginger is delicious with pork. Tzuki, an exchange student from Okinawa, Japan prepared “Ginger Pork” for our family to enjoy. Her secret was to marinate thinly sliced pork for 30 minutes in soy sauce, sake and fresh ginger. We have since added it to the family dinner “line-up”.

Tzuki preparing ginger pork

Tzuki preparing ginger pork

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  1. Martin Baldan says:

    Hi, Susie.

    A bit late for this post, but here’s what I’ve found about ginger:

    Source:
    http://www.ifrj.upm.edu.my/17%20%2802%29%202010/IFRJ-2010-335-347_Purnomo_Indonesia1.pdf

    “The effects of type and time of thermal processing on ginger
    (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) rhizome antioxidant compounds and its
    quality”

    Purnomo, H., 2 Jaya, F. and 3 Widjanarko, S. B.

    Department of Animal Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Animal Husbandry,
    Brawijaya University, Malang, Jawa Timur, Indonesia
    Department of Animal Husbandry, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences and Nature
    Resources, Tribhuwana Tunggadewi University, Malang, Jawa Timur, Indonesia
    Department Food Technology, Faculty of Agricultural Technology, Brawijaya
    University, Malang, Jawa Timur, Indonesia

    International Food Research Journal 17: 335-347

    Page 4 and 5 of 13

    Table 2. Identified compounds of fresh elephant ginger rhizome extract.

    (Compendium from both fresh and boiled, duplications removed)

    1-Hexadecanol
    1-Hexadecene
    2-methyl-2-Undecanethiol
    2-Undecanone
    3,6-Dimethyl-2,3,3a,4,5,7a-hexahydrobenzofuran
    4-Ethylguaiacol
    9-Octadecenoic Acid
    Alpha-farnesene
    Alpha-Pinene
    ar-curcumen
    Artemesia Triene
    Beta-bisabolene
    beta-elemene
    Beta-elemene
    Beta-myrcene
    Beta-Phellandrene
    Beta-sesquiphellandrene
    Borneol
    Camphene
    Carene
    Cis-Carveol
    Citral
    Decanal
    Dehydrolinalool
    d-nerolidol
    E-Citral
    Edulan II
    Elemol
    Epi-bicyclosesquiphellandrene
    (E,Z)-5,6-bis-(2,2-dimethylpropylidene)-Decane
    Geranyl Acetate
    Geranyl butyrate
    Hexanal
    Isobornyl Acetate
    Isocaryophyllen
    Linalool
    Methyl ester
    Nerolidol
    (-)-Nortrachelogenin
    Octadecene
    Octanal
    Propiconazole
    Surfynol
    Thujyl Alcohol
    Trans-Carveol
    (Z) Beta-farnesene
    Zingerone
    Zingiberene

    Some substances are available and authorized as such, some are not. For the authorization in Europe, they must have a currently valid Flavis number. IIRC, for the USA they must have a valid FEMA number, right?

    The following (I think) are NOT authorized in Europe:

    alpha-zingiberene
    1-hexadecene
    2-methyl-2-Undecanethiol
    ar-curcumene
    artemisia triene
    beta-elemene (But we do have: delta-elemene)
    beta-phellandrene (But we do have: alpha-Phellandrene)
    cis-carveol (CAS: 1197-06-4. But we do have: “Carveol”, AKA “laevo-carveol”, CAS: 99-48-9, Flavis 02.062, FEMA 2247)
    Edulan II (CAS: 41678-30-2)
    Epi-bicyclosesquiphellandrene
    (E,Z)-5,6-bis-(2,2-dimethylpropylidene)-Decane
    isocaryophyllene (CAS: 118-65-0)
    (-)-Nortrachelogenin (CAS: 34444-37-6)
    1-octadecene (CAS: 112-88-9)
    Propiconazole
    surfynol (CAS: 107-54-0)
    trans-carveol (CAS: 1197-07-5)
    (Z)-beta-farnesene (CAS: 28973-97-9 . But we do have: alpha-Farnesene)
    Zingiberene

    The rest are, in principle, authorized. It’s a pity that we can’t have Zingiberene. It looks very important :/

    Cheers!
    -Martin