Jufran Banana Sauce (aka Banana “Ketchup”) review

Jufran Banana Sauce ("Banana Ketchup")Ketchup is known as “America’s National Condiment”.  The sweet & sour taste of ketchup goes extremely well with fried foods and is always available  at places that serve hotdogs, hamburgers and french fries. Recently, I read the book Pure Ketchup by Andrew Smith. This book was well researched and enlightening. Something I learned that there is banana ketchup in the Philippines. My husband is Filipino and I was surprised that he never introduced me to banana ketchup. Therefore, on our recent visit to Seafood City outside of Seattle, I went shopping and picked some up.

There is no tomato in Jufran Banana Sauce and yet it is reminiscent the tomato ketchup I know.  There is a slight texture difference and higher sweetness and banana taste. The ingredient statement lists the following:

Water, sugar, banana, Iodized salt, modified starch, spices, sodium benzoate, acidic acid, onion powder, garlic powder, FD&C yellow 5, Red 40, Titanium dioxide and banana flavor. 2 Tablespoons have 40 calories, 3% carbohydrates and 13% of RDI of sodium.

Heinz tomato ketchup has the following ingredient statement:

Tomato concentrate (red ripe tomatoes), distilled vinegar, high fructose corn syrup, corn syrup, salt, spice, onion powder, natural flavors. 2 Tablespoons have 40 calories, 4% carbohydrates and 14% of RDI of sodium.

Both products are not really nutritious. The US does not consider ketchup a vegetable in school lunches and France has banned ketchup at school. Jufran Banana Sauce is less natural, though, because it has preservatives (sodium benzoate) and FD&C colors. Jufran Banana Sauce  doesn’t require refrigeration because of those additives.

The United States has strict laws on what can be labeled ketchup (21 CFR 155.194) and it must be tomato based. Traditionally and globally, ketchup is not defined by such standards. Banana ketchup in the Philippines makes perfect sense to me. According to my husband, bananas are a favorite food in the Philipines and are in abundance.

 

 

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Comments

  1. Jeffrey Lang says:

    Susie, I wish you well in this endeavour. I was disappointed by the report on the banana ketchup. I just purchased a bottle (incredibly cheap) and was looking for a page just like yours but it told me nothing I didn’t alresdy know. I would have expected some detailed description of taste and texture. How it appears in the bottle, how it pours. Why it’s red but made from bananas. Which flavours worked well with it. Some foods you tried with this condiment. How it is traditionally used. Points that pleased you and didn’t. That’s what I think food reviews should cover. Maybe I missed a page. Best wishes.
    J.L.
    Victoria B.C.

    • Susie Bautista says:

      Hi JL, Thank you for the detailed feedback, I really appreciate your comments. I’ll keep you points in mind for future reviews.

  2. Real nice design and wonderful content material , nothing at all else we require : D.

  3. To all you jufran lovers: Jufran and Mufran are technically the same thing… Jufran bought Mufran… My grandfather’s family are the creators of Mufran which means they made Jufran……. If it wasn’t for my grandfather you guys would never would of tried this delicious ketchup….